Covers: Activity Resources Relation to National Curriculum Downloads
Activity One - Identifying Fossils

Activity 1

Identifying Fossils
Activity Two - Chocolate Fossil Model

Activity 2

Chocolate Fossil Model
STEM Activity

Activity Three - Creating A Cast Fossil

Activity 3

Creating A Cast Fossil
  • 1 cup of table salt
  • ½ cup of plain flour
  • ¾ cup of water
  • Mixing bowl
  • Plastic cup
  • Plaster of Paris
  • Plastic container (for the fossil)
  • Plastic container (to mix plaster)
  • Stick
STEM Activity
Activity Four - Measuring Dinosaurs

Activity 4

Measuring Dinosaurs
STEM Activity
Activity Five - Mary Anning Timeline

Activity 5

Mary Anning Timeline

Activity Six - Coprolite Model

Activity 6

Coprolite Model
  • Coprolite Video
  • ¾ cup plain flour
  • ½ cup salt
  • ¼ cup instant coffee granules
  • Water
  • Uncooked pasta (fusilli / penne)
  • Green paper / leaves
  • Mixing bowl
  • Plastic cup
STEM Activity

Fossils Activities

Activity 1 - Identifying Fossils

Activity 1

Identifying Fossils

Hands-On Activities:
Activity 2 - Chocolate Fossil Model

Activity 2

Chocolate Fossil Model

Hands-On Activities:
Activity 3 - Creating A Cast Fossil

Activity 3

Creating A Cast Fossil

Hands-On Activities:
  • 1 cup of table salt
  • ½ cup of plain flour
  • ¾ cup of water
  • Mixing bowl
  • Plastic cup
  • Plaster of Paris
  • Plastic container (for the fossil)
  • Plastic container (to mix plaster)
  • Stick
Activity 4 - Measuring Dinosaurs

Activity 4

Measuring Dinosaurs

Hands-On Activities:
Activity 5 - Mary Anning Timeline

Activity 5

Mary Anning Timeline

Hands-On Activities:
Activity 6 - Coprolite Model

Activity 6

Coprolite Model

Hands-On Activities:
  • Coprolite Video
  • ¾ cup plain flour
  • ½ cup salt
  • ¼ cup instant coffee granules
  • Water
  • Uncooked pasta (fusilli / penne)
  • Green paper / leaves
  • Mixing bowl
  • Plastic cup

What teacher guidance is provided for teaching about rocks and fossils?

"Welcome to Hands-On Education, your ultimate resource hub for primary school teachers and home educators seeking a comprehensive range of activities for key stage one and key stage two students. We understand the value of your time as a busy teacher or parent, which is why we have curated an extensive collection of both free and paid activities that perfectly align with core curriculum topics in English, maths, and science.

For key stage one students, we highly recommend our free phonics activities that foster the development of essential reading and writing skills. To support their mathematical growth, our paid maths activities offer engaging games and exercises that make learning addition, subtraction, and multiplication an interactive experience. Meanwhile, our science activities delve into captivating experiments exploring the human body and the environment.

Moving on to key stage two students, we proudly present a diverse selection of free and paid activities designed to closely align with the core curriculum in English, maths, and science. Our free English activities encompass an array of writing prompts and reading comprehension exercises, empowering children to enhance their language skills. In the realm of mathematics, our paid activities offer an exciting range of games and exercises that effectively teach fractions, decimals, and percentages. For budding scientists, our science activities feature captivating experiments focused on electricity and sound.

For our esteemed home educators, we have curated a wealth of activities that can be effortlessly conducted at home with minimal resources. Our fossil experiments ingeniously utilize common household items, providing invaluable insights into the wonders of the world around us. Similarly, our English and maths activities can be readily implemented with just a pen and paper, ensuring a seamless learning experience within the comfort of your home.

We wholeheartedly believe that learning should always be a joyful and engaging journey, and we are committed to supporting you in achieving just that. With our comprehensive collection of resources and activities, we aim to equip you with the tools necessary to facilitate effective teaching and learning experiences, ultimately fostering a lifelong love for education in young minds."

What class clips from BBC are useful for illustrating various points on the topic of rocks and fossils?

There is a collection of class clips from BBC specifically curated to enhance understanding of various aspects related to rocks and fossils. These clips, titled "Rocks, soils and fossils Class Clips," are highly valuable for illustrating key points and concepts on the topic. They offer a range of informative content that can greatly aid in learning about rocks, soils, and fossils.

What external links are available for further learning about fossils, including videos and resources on Mary Anning?

There are several external links available for further learning about fossils, including videos and resources on Mary Anning. One such resource is the "BBC Nature-Fossils" page, which provides videos showcasing how fossils resemble living animals, fossil finds around the world, and the process of fossil formation. The page also includes a clip called "Mud fossils" that demonstrates how a fossil of a fish is formed. This clip can be used in the classroom to simulate the process of fossil formation and help children understand that fossils were once living organisms. Additionally, the page mentions "Living fossils" such as the tuatara, coelacanth, and monkey puzzle tree, which can be used as examples when comparing fossils to living creatures.

Another resource is a monologue based on the life story of Mary Anning, a prominent scientist in the field of paleontology. This resource is part of a CPD (Continuing Professional Development) unit on using drama in science. It aims to help children develop an understanding of the human face of science by portraying the experiences of Mary Anning. This resource can provide insight into the contributions and significance of Mary Anning in the field of paleontology. Additionally, the page suggests introducing children to other paleontologists like Robert Bakker, who served as a technical advisor for the original Jurassic Park. It also recommends organizing visits to museums and inviting geologists into schools through university outreach groups.

Lastly, the "Rocks, soils and fossils Class Clips" from the BBC provide a selection of videos that are useful for illustrating various points related to rocks and fossils. These class clips can serve as additional learning resources for students studying the topic of fossils.

By exploring these external links, individuals can gain a deeper understanding of fossils, witness the process of fossil formation, learn about influential figures like Mary Anning, and access additional educational videos and resources on rocks and fossils.

What activities are included in the Rocks: Rocks and Fossils lesson plans for exploring rocks, testing hardness, and observing how rocks are used?

The Rocks: Rocks and Fossils lesson plans encompass a plethora of engaging activities for students to explore the world of rocks. These activities include the meticulous process of sorting rocks and providing them with apt names. Additionally, students will be able to test the hardness and other physical properties of rocks, providing them with a deeper understanding of their characteristics. Within the lesson plans, students will also conduct tests on soil samples, allowing them to explore the composition of the Earth's uppermost layer. Furthermore, students will have the invaluable opportunity to observe how rocks are utilized in various ways throughout their school environment, thereby gaining insights into the practical applications of rocks in everyday life.

Who was Mary Anning and what did she contribute to the study of fossils?

Mary Anning, a prominent figure during the 19th century, gained widespread recognition as a notable fossil hunter and collector. Her significant contributions to the field of palaeontology, the study of ancient life, solidified her status as a key figure in scientific exploration.

Mary Anning's remarkable discoveries served as a cornerstone in the advancement of palaeontology. Through her dedicated efforts, she unearthed numerous fossils that proved to be critical in expanding our understanding of prehistoric life. Her findings included remarkable specimens such as the first complete ichthyosaur skeleton, multiple plesiosaurs, and an exquisite pterodactyl.

Anning's expertise in fossil identification and her meticulous excavation techniques were unparalleled during her time, allowing her to recover delicate and well-preserved specimens. These remarkable discoveries sparked significant interest in the scientific community and fueled extensive research on ancient life forms.q

Furthermore, Mary Anning's contributions went beyond her exceptional individual findings. She shared her knowledge and discoveries with prominent scientists and scholars of her era, such as William Buckland and Richard Owen. Her collaboration and information exchange with these experts played a crucial role in furthering the understanding of fossilized remains.

Mary Anning's immense impact on the field of palaeontology cannot be understated. Her findings and expertise not only expanded the knowledge of prehistoric life but also challenged existing beliefs and contributed to the overall advancement of scientific inquiry. Today, her legacy continues to inspire future generations of scientists to explore and uncover the mysteries of our ancient world.

How are fossils formed when things that have lived are trapped within rock?

Fossils are formed when once-living organisms become trapped within rocks. There are several processes that contribute to the formation of fossils.

One common type of fossil is known as a true form fossil. These fossils are made up of the actual remains of plants or animals. When an organism dies, its hard parts, such as bones or stems, can become buried in sediment. Over time, the sediment hardens into rock, preserving the organism's remains. It's important to note that the soft parts of the body, like skin and muscle, often decompose before fossilization occurs. In true form fossils, the original organism has been replaced by mineral deposits, so the fossil appears as a solid replica.

Another type of fossil is called a trace fossil. These fossils provide valuable information about an animal's behavior and lifestyle. They include fossilized footprints, burrows, and even fecal matter. Rather than preserving the physical remains of an organism, trace fossils retain indirect evidence of the animal's presence.

Mold fossils are a third type that can form when an organism leaves behind a hollow impression in sediment. As the organism decomposes, the surrounding sediment hardens, creating a cast of the impression. This cast serves as a natural replica of the original organism, providing insights into its shape and structure.

In summary, fossils are formed when the remains of organisms are trapped within rock. The process varies depending on the type of fossil. True form fossils preserve the actual parts of the organism, trace fossils capture indirect evidence of the animal's existence, and mold fossils create imprints that can form casts of the original organism. These different types of fossils provide valuable insights into ancient life on Earth.

How are the lessons structured to engage students in learning about rocks, fossils, and soils?

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