Nurturing A Relationship With Nature

What could be more important that connecting with nature, feeling the calm of a flowing river or the dampness of moist grass on bare feet!

Teddy jumping around rocks by a river.
Teddy jumping on rocks by a river.

The Benefits

The outside world provides a wondrous place for our children to learn, socialise and exercise. All of these aspects are important in a child’s development. Exploring outside comes to them instinctively, encourages observation and inspires imagination. Whether this is climbing trees, following a ladybird or playing tag with friends, this is hands-on learning in its purest form.

Teddy sitting by a local river.
Teddy sitting by a local river.

Nature Walks

With two active and energetic children, winter is no time for us to hibernate and we continue to explore nature throughout the coldest months. We go outside every day, come rain or shine. Though I must admit I am a little less enthusiastic on the rainy days! There is always something new to notice and appreciate.

Connecting with nature doesn’t mean you have to relocate to the lake district.

Hidden Treasures

For me, winter is a time to spy natures hidden treasures. Birds’ nests which were hidden in the spring are now visible. The dew on a spider’s web sparkles in the light. And today we spotted the best treasure of all – the snowdrop. Every year it amazes me that this delicate white flower can bloom in this cold season, a promise that spring is on its way.

Harry holding opened nuts. Finding treasures in nature is one of his favourite things in life.
Harry holding opened nuts. Finding treasures in nature is one of his favourite things in life.

Finding Your Connection With Nature

I completely understand that not everyone has easy access to the outdoors. When we lived in a tower block in London we were surrounded by busy roads and other high rises. In the heart of Kings Cross I discovered a small sanctuary – a community garden. I cannot tell you how special this place was and what it meant to me to be able to take the boys somewhere green, where they could water the flowers, dig for worms and play in the dirt.

Connecting with nature doesn’t mean you have to relocate to the lake district. Even nature walks aren’t for everyone and there are many other ways you can foster a relationship between your child and nature. If this is new to you, start small and discover which aspect in nature your child really enjoys. Whether it be sports, gardening or bird watching, nurture your child’s love for nature.

Harry planting early seeds to germinate inside.
Harry planting early seeds to germinate inside.

8 Ideas To Start Nurturing A Relationship With Nature

  1. Plant seeds at home, in your garden or inside. Sometimes a sunny windowsill is just as good as a greenhouse!
  2. Place indoor plants around your home for your children to water and take care of.
  3. Locate a RHS community garden in your area where you can join others in gardening and growing food.
  4. Find your local RSPB nature reserve to visit. Some nature reserves organise family activity days.
  5. Collect items to create a nature display based on the season or theme.
  6. Encourage birds and insects into your garden by making a bird’s feeder or bug house.
  7. Use nature to inspire your child’s artwork. This might be drawing, painting or making a collage.
  8. Provide opportunities for your child to play outside.

Discover Hands-On Education

I'm so glad you found us and I hope you have a further look at some of the amazing activities we have on offer. Below is a list of 5 hands-on activities all linked to nature.

Year 1
Seasons (Free)

Going on a winter walk.

Year 2
Weather

Playing with shadows.

Year 2
Art In Nature

Making art from nature.

Year 1
Plants

Looking at foxglove.

Year 2
Plants

Coloured Celery